The Second Battle on Schedule for St. Patrick’s Day Release!

Man looking at camera, wearing black and white makeup, with beardAll the editing and formatting are done (I hope) and the proof copy was shipped this morning! If it looks as good in real life as it does on the online previewer, we’ll be able to hit PUBLISH, and The Second Battle will be available for purchase on Amazon in both print and Kindle versions.

The Second Battle is a fictional retelling of the Irish myth of the The Second Battle of Moytura. According to the prophecy, Lugh is destined to kill his own grandfather. Determined to escape his fate, he runs the risk of drawing all of Ireland into war.

The story of Cath Maige Tuired has enthralled readers since the 9th Century. With this fictionalized retelling, the exciting story of the Battle for Ireland between the Tuatha Dé Danann and the Fomori reaches a new generation of young adult readers.

On the evening of St. Patrick’s Day, we’ll be celebrating the release online with some fun and games. Check out the Facebook event page and be sure to join us!

The Second Battle Online Release Party!

One caveat for sensitive readers, though. If your middle schooler isn’t ready to read, say, some of the exploits of Zeus from Greek mythology, you might want them to wait until their a little older. The book is recommended for ages 13 and older. The gods sometimes have a different idea of what’s right and wrong than humans do.

The Second Battle Trailer

Check out the trailer for The Second Battle!

According to the prophecy, Lugh is destined to kill his own grandfather. Determined to escape his fate, he runs the risk of drawing all of Ireland into war.

The story of Cath Maige Tuired has enthralled readers since the 9th Century. With this fictionalized retelling, the exciting story of the Battle for Ireland between the Tuatha Dé Danann and the Fomori reaches a new generation of young adult readers.

Coming Soon: The Second Battle

I’m working hard right now to finish up the final edits and formatting on The Second Battle. This novella is a retelling of the Second Battle of Moytura from Irish mytholgy especially for a YA and older audience. It had been previously published, and I’m re-releasing it with Four Phoenixes. I’m not going to announce a release date until I’m sure I have my ducks in a row, but I hope to have it ready to go by St. Patrick’s Day!

Whose Feminism?

For some reason, a year and half after my originally posting this post, a slew of some variety of feminists (at least I’m assuming they’re feminists–it was hard to tell, really) have commented negatively on my suggestion that perhaps Little Women heroine Jo March might have been described by Louisa May Alcott as transgender or genderfluid–or whatever passed for those ideas in the 19th Century. Not sure where-all my blog post went on the Intertubes, but wow, are they indignant about such an idea, and all responded in a cluster over a 24-hour period. Somehow, I either killed their sacred cow in Jo March, or I destroyed feminism itself by calling her a man. Which, if you read the post, I did not. Jo is a woman, and she remains a woman throughout the novel. If she, or Alcott, were in any way genderfluid, then the 19th Century didn’t have much for them in any event. My speculation is just that, speculation. Creative thinking. Thinking about possibilities. Alcott lived an extraordinary and unconventional life, after all.

I am not at all opposed to differing opinions in online discussions. Don’t see a transgender issue in Little Woman? Fine, no problem. We can discuss that, as well as many other possibilities within the text. What I do take issue with, however, is the notion that transgender or genderfluid people take something away from or invalidate women and their feminism. I never said that Jo March was all those wonderful things because she was “really a man.” That’s just bull-hockey, and the comments I received reflected a simplistic and strictly binary view of human gender and sexuality. Those sorts of second-wave comments (and I’m a tail-end second-wave feminist, mind) have no place in a modern understanding of human gender and gender expression, and they will not see light of day on my blog.

If your feminism doesn’t include transgender people, then you need a new feminism.